Inktober Update: Nerd Out of Hell 2–Back into (Anime) Hell

As it would turn out, even the best laid plans have their way of going awry. You might recall that in last week’s Inktober Round-Up, I set a goal for myself this year: stick to a particular theme for each week of the challenge. I had intended to warm up with a few days of fun and fluffy fan-art before diving into a week full of witches, spooks, specters, and things that go bump in the night. This worked…for a few days. As my girl Emily Dickinson once said, “The heart wants what it wants”, and much to nobody’s surprise, my fragile little heart burns bright with an ardent nerd-fire that has yet to be quelled.  So here I am– a few days later than anticipated– proudly delivering another hot batch of fan-fueled Inktober magic:

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BLP Shenanigans for October/November: Live Appearances, Extra Life, and More!

Hello hello hello!  Wowie, dear readers, I am caffeinated!  And very excited to share what BloodLetterPress is going to be up to for the next few months!  We’ve had this blog up for a while now and have been churning out content ever since, but as the final days of Halloween Month draw closer, we’re getting ready to explode forth from our blog format into REAL LIVE APPEARANCES with our REAL LIFE SELVES!  Details under the cut!

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Going Around: Colorful Descriptions

Hey all, I (Nagi) am in charge of this week’s Going Around feature. I wanted to stick with the theme of fall, but we already did spooky last week. But the autumnal times are also periods of wonderful color, at least if you’re living in certain climate zones. So I want to ask:

Why is color important in creative media? What are your favorite examples of color in a piece of art or a narrative?

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Books In The Wizard’s Library, Volume 3

Even More Books in the Wizard’s Library (some translated into Common by the Society for a Vernacular Zenith)

1: From Many, One, by Jenth Cooper (memoir of an awakened flesh golem, in Old Common)

2: An Ethnobotany of the Gleaming Swamp, by Ecalsis Wide-Eyes (in Sylvan, but trails off into pictographs and asemic writing at the end of each chapter; excellent botanical illustrations)

3: A Beginner’s Guide to Cobblecraft, by Ricki Hobnail (instructions on the creation and enchantment of magical footwear)

4: People of the Rune: a Study of the Ilumians, by J.F. Shmatz (iffy scholarship, but words glow blue and float off the page, so it ought to be worth something, right?)

5: An Anatomical Atlas of the Purple Worm, by Alysha Wroughtiron (includes a 10:1 scale foldout [8 feet long] with several layers of cross-section)

6: Where We Flock Together: A Living History of the Good Partridge Tavern, by Toastmaster Groth Jarlson (includes partridge-based recipes; book will hunt partridges by itself if removed from library)

7: The Definitive Museum of Fatespinner Textiles, by Lord Huecorro Sartor (one incorporated textile is poisonous on contact)

8: Shieldcraft, by Ulgurk Ulrich (book has been used as the key to a cipher; covered in scrawled notes, nearly illegible)

9: The Nopos Manifesto, by Orlog Siegetongue (made of cut-up bits of other books, preaches novelty and originality as the highest virtues of art; heated debate over this text distracted from several high-profile heists by its author)

10: The Monarchist’s Cookbook, no author (anti-insurrectionist explosives assembly manual)

11: Popular Folk Songs of the Asedia Lowlands, by Picadilly Stout (notation for mandolin, hand drum, and reed flute)

12: Grand Evocations of the Ancient Pistians (beautiful fake; curses thieves in 1d4 minutes, or explodes on anyone who opens it)

13: Interviews with Those Guarded by Unicorns, by Wasseli Fillamentra (constructed of cotton, wool, and other gently-harvested fibers, written with walnut ink).

14: Filvire Spangrov: A Life, A Death, An Unlife, by Dictus Abraxis (biography of lich by the detective who killed it)

15: Sentimentalism: An Ethical History of Charm Spells, by Rev. Lorelai Craishin (includes section on recreational use)

16: The Wizard’s Guide to Obtaining Free Labor, by The Great & Terrible Progadrius (hollowed out, pages glued together with dried blood; hollow contains copy of The Case for Lizardfolk Self-Determination by Genko of the Poison Fen)

17: The Theoretical Sixth Spellbook of Ivonne Dalehelm, transcribed by Fasaal Ibn-Ezesh (exists only when thought about)

18: We Love Macreedis Serpret, by his twenty-six homunculi (Serpret made this and other copies but keeps the original)

19: Sonnets by Glarthrek (flyleaf informs reader that opening book summons invisible horrors that attack if book is not finished in one sitting)

20: The Tome of the True Gourmand, by Gastrique, the Sultan of Spice (most recipes call for extremely exotic/expensive ingredients; careful perusal provides permanent +2 bonus to Profession (chef) or related skill)


Look for more installments of Books in the Wizard’s Library in the future.  -ð

Going Around: Getting Spooky

Here at BloodLetterPress, we’re simply not satisfied with a single day of Halloween.  Every day of October thus far has been yet another mischief-filled day of Halloween Month.  We’re celebrating Second Halloween a few months from now when our contributor Nagi returns from overseas.  We’ve been stocking up on candy for Reverse Trick-Or-Treating and watching a new horror film every other night or so.  This week, we thought we’d share some of our favorite pieces of seasonally spine-chilling media.

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Inktober week One: The Island of Misfit Weebs

People of the internet rejoice: Inktober has been off to a great start! Friends near and far have been hard at work, pressing that pen to page every day, getting one step closer to the finish line! “But what’s drawing so much inspiration from these people?”, you might ask. Well, truly awful puns aside, that’s a great question. The answers you get will differ from artist to artist. Some folks like to stick to the official list. Some folks will follow alternate lists, much like this one I posted last week. Then, there are folks like myself, who, despite their best intentions, are a bit all over the place. This year, I’ve decided to (more or less) stick to a particular theme for each week of Inktober. This week’s theme has been “Fanart”, with a more specific focus on anime and manga series that have wormed their way into my heart.

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Are We Having Fun Yet? (Part 2)

So, last week, I introduced the problem I was having with making engaging combat encounters with my teenage player group with a DnD homebrew system I’m running. And I promised an answer for my game design woes. Well, here it is:

I don’t really enjoy combat encounters myself. (Was that dramatic reveal worth the wait? Don’t answer that).

And from what I’ve seen, my players don’t either. But games like DnD are literally designed around combat encounters (or at least the first four editions were, I don’t have much experience with 5e); your character gains power and levels through EXP and loot obtained after beating up baddies. It’s more than something you’re encouraged to do via game mechanics; it’s the game’s M.O. It’s how you play the game.

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Going Around: Desert Island Comics

Wait, shouldn’t it be deserted island, not desert island?  Wikipedia says that “desert” used to refer to any “desolate and sparsely occupied or unoccupied” place.  Whatever; times change, language is mutable, we all face the looming inevitable–but until then, comics!  Our panel of contributors shares their picks for absolute must-have comics for an island getaway/shipwreck scenario.

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Fresh Ink: 31 Prompts to Get the Creative Juices Flowing this Inktober

It’s the most wonderful time of the year: scratchy sweaters, stuffing your face with pumpkin spice everything, and huddling around the ol’ bonfire for some skin crawling stories with friends. October is simply 31 days of all the best things that Autumn has to offer. Among these offerings is the beloved (and at times anxiety-inspiring) tradition of “Inktober”. Created by Mr. Jake Parker in 2009, the premise is simple: make an ink drawing once a day, for thirty-one consecutive days. Much like its literary sibling “NaNoWriMo”, Inktober is meant to inspire and challenge artists to improve their skills, and experiment with new ideas.

This year will mark my third consecutive Inktober, and I could not be more excited. You can bet your buns I’ve got a sketchbook and fresh pencils just waiting to be put to work. While Inktober is meant to be a fun creative exercise, sometimes it can be tougher than you thought to squeeze that drawing a day into your schedule. Perhaps you only have ten minutes to dedicate to your drawing, somebody’s getting married, you’ve begun living the plot of a heist movie, you’re facing a rough depressive streak or, maybe, you have just plain run out of ideas. Well, no worries babes, Miki’s gotcha.

You can find Mr. Jake Parker’s official Inktober 2017 page here.

Parker’s prompts tend to be single words, implying action or character qualities. I’m here to provide a list of 31 alternative/additional prompts to keep tough stuff like you producing quality Inktober magic when the going gets tough:

Continue reading Fresh Ink: 31 Prompts to Get the Creative Juices Flowing this Inktober