Tag Archives: actual play report

JiffyCon Roundup!

BloodLetterPress (represented by Miki and myself) made our live debut at JiffyCon this weekend!  Here’s some of the cool stuff we did.

We kicked off the morning by playing a game of Fuel Priest, a dieselpunk RPG in development by Timeless Caverns.  I personally think dieselpunk is a criminally underrated genre (and am working on a dieselpunk setting of my own), so I was excited enough by the concept of Fuel Priest when we sat down to play, but if I had known what I was in for, I would have been practically ravenous for this game.  In the 34 pages of their current design, the folks at Timeless Caverns have created a game driven by hope, desperation, and reverence, where characters are defined by their kinship with their tools and their various interpretations of a common dogma.  It’s a work of elegant design married to exciting and timely narrative themes, and I can’t wait to play it again, or see the next step in its evolution.

From there, we ate a quick lunch, and Miki went to play Brodie’s  Here Is My Power Button, which I’ll let them write about.  After navigating a logistical hall of mirrors, I found myself playing Elliot Baker’s Tiny and Chrome, a Lego-based car combat game in homage to Mad Max: Fury Road.  While I don’t speak from a wealth of experience, this was easily the most fun I have ever had playing a miniatures game—intuitive rules ensured that each turn passed quickly, and playing with five other people meant that the board state changed explosively every round.

Rhino, Speedy, T-Bone, Gasser, and Slevine lie rent asunder as Cadillac and The Incinerator square off with Hedgehog and Skeeter for the final showdown! Photo credit: Meguey Baker

And, finally, we ran a game of our own Stars Fall Up!  I did a terrible job of explaining the rules, but it didn’t take long for our shared story to take off into a madcap Pilot City full of gondolas and ziplines, werewolf law, and suspicious turtles, which culminated in a boss battle against a Voltron made of Radio Shacks beneath a total eclipse of Planet Marsha.  Huge thanks to Dylan, Brodie, and Aaron for checking out our game and lending your splendid imaginations to our evening!  And huge thanks as well to Modern Myths and the organizers of JiffyCon 2017, for giving us the infrastructure we needed to expand our community, meet new people, and feel like Real Life Professionals!

BloodLetterPress careens forward into November with more fresh content coming to you a couple times a week here on our website.  Our Extra Life fundraiser culminates on November 14th in a 24-hour video game stream on our Twitch channel, which coincides with a DEATHWRITE: DEATHNOWRIMO 2017 EDITION for you writers out there.  Until then, we hope your Halloween is the best ever!

The Last Adventure of Red the Firbolg

I just played through my favorite character exit I’ve ever seen in person, and I’d love to tell you about it. It might brighten your day.

A local friend kicked off a 5th Edition D&D game a while ago, set in a Dark Souls-style dark fantasy setting. The other players were playing an orc hardboiled detective, a tiefling warlock whose familiar was a best-selling author, a kor cliff-acrobat, and, for some reason, a shifter monk who was basically the robot gorilla from the cover of the FATE Core Rulebook. I decided to play counter to the tone of the setting a little bit and made a firbolg druid, exiled from his forest home for political reasons. Firbolgs (which in 5e are blue-skinned forest-dwelling demi-giants, like how an elf might picture a giant) don’t have names, but the party ended up calling him Red, after his red hair. Red loved nature. Like, really loved it, with giddy enthusiasm. Think Leslie Knope from Parks and Rec with none of the organizational skill. He was the party’s two-hundred-fifty-pound medic and chef (he took the Gourmand feat), who could talk to animals and plants and be understood, but couldn’t receive a response without further magical aid. His spellcasting focus was a live squirrel. I decided to roll for my ability scores instead of doing point-buy, and ended up with pretty fantastic stats in everything but Intelligence. Red knew how to use every plant he’d ever seen, but had no idea what any of their names were. Firbolgs don’t have names, y’know?

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