Tag Archives: scriv

Album Review: Nine Inch Nails, Bad Witch

I’m probably past the point of providing an unbiased review of a Nine Inch Nails release. Over the years, I’ve immersed myself in Trent Reznor’s music to such a degree that I feel I can address his work in totality, with a scope encompassing the ongoing life cycle of Nine Inch Nails, and, to a degree, industrial music in general.  Given that, I regret to report that Bad Witch is kind of a lackluster release, and presents a less-than-fulfilling conclusion to the trilogy of EPs that began with Not The Actual Events and continued with Add Violence.

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Authorial Intent, the Ethics of Structure, and the Punk Rock Ethos

In my senior year of college, I wrote, directed, and acted in an adaptation of Hamlet set to the music of Nine Inch Nails.  After the final performance, while being grilled by my professors, I realized that, with no intention of doing so, I’d created a misogynistic piece of art. (For those of you unfamiliar with Shakespeare, there are two female roles in Hamlet: Gertrude, Hamlet’s mother, and Ophelia, his girlfriend. Neither of them fare terribly well in Shakespeare’s script). In my desire to keep the play’s story intact and get inside Hamlet’s head, I had consigned Getrude and Ophelia to their tropey fates and validated the tired Madonna/whore complex that Hamlet uses to reduce them to caricatures.  This would have been understandable if I were staging a more traditional Hamlet. But somehow, even though I was bringing in projections and smoke machines and rewriting the entire script and replacing huge chunks of it with sordid industrial rock numbers, there was some part of Shakespeare’s Hamlet that was sacred to me, that I couldn’t bring myself to reshape or discard: the fundamental arc of its story. I was blind to two things at the time:

  1. That story uses the death of women as plot points to amplify the desires of men to kill each other, and if I was comitted 100% to telling that precise story, I could not escape that crappy trope, and
  2. If rearranging, recontextualizing, or completely destroying the plot of Shakespeare’s masterwork was going to offend anyone, I was probably going to lose those people right around my version of Act I Scene 2, where Claudius lip-synchs “Big Man With A Gun” accompanied by lasers and lots of gyrating pelvises. No one who remained would be upset if I gave the women more agency and depth.

So, yeah, that’s how I put about two years of mental energy and weeks and weeks of blood, sweat, and tears into a piece of art that betrayed my principles. All of which is to say, let’s talk about intent of the artist vs. message of the work.

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Scriv’s Favorite Albums of 2018: Beyond Creation, Algorythm

Since The Faceless started falling apart and Meshuggah had a brand-new genre label foisted upon them, Beyond Creation have been my go-to band for technical death metal. The Montréalais quartet don’t sound like every other tech death band, and honestly, given how samey tech death tends to be, that’s enough to get me interested. But Beyond Creation went beyond getting me interested and got me well and properly hooked.

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Going Around: Recent Reads

Okay, so, we’re really preaching to the choir on this one; if you’re a regular here, you’re probably something of a bookworm, or have been one in the past.  That said, books are more underrated than ever nowadays as a substantial form of entertainment.  Herein are the literary weights we at BLP have been using to flex our imagination muscles.

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Going Around: Summer Jams

Summer as a season of explosive energy is one of the oldest big moods.  Summer blockbusters, summer vacation, summer camp, summer jams–it’s a time to cut loose, go on adventures, be maximalist.  In particular, the summer jam is an exciting concept; it  unifies us, but also acts as a statement of our individuality, for while we might all go nuts when the latest huge hit drops in July, we’ve also got our standby songs to sing along to at the top of our lungs while driving with the windows down.  This week, our panel of contributors shares their summer jams on a playlist, and writes about their picks.

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In Which Scriv Gets Mad About A Film

Assuming you haven’t already, don’t go see Infinity War.

In order to preserve suspense and enjoyment for a first watching, we sometimes provide spoiler alerts. There is no suspense in this film, nor, outside of some one-liners, is there anything to be enjoyed. I trust you to make the right choice for you about whether or not to continue reading.

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Restoring the Sky Tyrant: Dragons as Contemporary Villains

Þa se wyrm onwoc, wroht wæs geniwad

— “When the dragon awoke, trouble flared again” (Beowulf, trans. Seamus Heaney, line 2287)

If you grew up on fantasy stories, dragons (in this post’s case, European dragons, the nasty, fire-belching, gold-hoarding, knight-slaying kind) were probably some of the first monsters you were introduced to as a child. They’re probably some of the first monsters you fell in love with as well (I still want to grow up to be Maleficent). It’s hard to imagine a time when dragons were a novel concept; thousands of years of elaboration and adaptation upon the draconic have produced dragons that are variously awe-inspiring, cute & cuddly, and totally metal, but rarely are they frightening or repulsive anymore (the Gaping Dragon from Dark Souls was probably the last dragon that made me recoil in horror). If we’re willing to get a little creative, though, dragons could be scary again. Let’s consider the fundamental features of these beasts, and what those features say about their role as antagonists.

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A Little Impostor Syndrome

Despite the fact that my game Jokers & Journeys has been part of the BLP catalogue since last November, I don’t consider myself a game designer just yet.  The reason why has something to do with this principle from Things We Think About Games: “Having played chess does not qualify you to answer ‘yes’ when you are asked ‘do you play chess?'”

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Going Around: Best of Arisia

In case yall couldn’t tell from our barrage of selfies and excited squealing this past weekend, BLP had an absolute blast at Arisia. We came, we sold stuff, we met a whole ensemble of really rad people and came away with our heads full of new ideas. In this Going Around we wanted to take a moment to reflect on the most meaningful moments and events that happened for each of us during the weekend.

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Going Around: Space Post Coast To Coast

Sometimes, it’s nice to gaze up into the stars and get some perspective.  You might contemplate the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, or try to hold in your mind the fact that even the emptiest bit of space you can see is filled with stars too far away for us to see from our planet.  You might wonder if there’s intelligent life looking back at us, and what their memes are like.  Maybe you’re tracing one of the constellations, ancient storytelling tools drawn through light-years of space, shapes that will last the course of human history several times over before the ever-shifting universe pulls them apart.  Maybe you’re just thinking about Carrie Fisher or Carl Sagan.  This week, our panel of contributors share with you some of our favorite stories that take place in the final frontier.

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